Hassler and Greenes of Pennsylvania and Roane County, Tennessee

Von Hasle Family

Hasler Families and Where They Came From

https://pdf.yt/d/mSI7HL3LWUhNPqpN

https://pdf.yt/d/mSI7HL3LWUhNPqpN

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/31627808

http://dk.geoview.info/hasle_bornholm_widok_elektrowni_wiatrowych_z_helikoptera_robinson_44_6082009,31627808p

 

http://www.cviog.uga.edu/georgia-info?url=/histcountymaps/murray1899map.htm

Hasle, which lies in this valley, is a small settlement of farmers, mentioned for … It was the local priest Leodegar von Meggen, a long-term scholar of the Jesuit .

Hasle, which lies in this valley, is a small settlement of farmers,
mentioned for the first time in 1236 (Horat, 1984, p.3). In order to illustrate
roughly the political potential of the region and the general circumstances in
the aftermath of which the Dances of Death in Wolhusen and Hasle were made,5 it is necessary to mention the following points. From the fifteenth century onwards, the inhabitants of the valley rose several times against their rulers in the town of Lucerne http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_41191_en.pdf

A short history of Switzerland By Karl Dändliker

http://books.google.com/books?id=Q4RYAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA58&lpg=PA58&dq=valley+of+von+hasle,&source=bl&ots=2Tq-Zpna8P&sig=wO5o5hf9-fUq-yJ3CkTJqRenKao&hl=en&sa=X&ei=rhVGVMmwK5OjyAS1o4KABA&ved=0CCsQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=valley%20of%20von%20hasle%2C&f=false

1 This event probably gave rise to the later development of the tradition of the massacre of Lucerne.

■ E. VON Wattenwil-diesbach, Oeschichte der Stadt und Landschaft Bern, >. vol. ii.

* For the connection between the new and the old houses of Kiburg ef. p. 42, note 1.

and began the struggle. In 1324 they acquired Laupen by purchase, destroyed some castles in the Jura, and joined Eberhard in attacking the counts of Neuchatel.

In 1330, however, Louis became reconciled to Austria, and Count Eberhard found his dependence upon Berne so irksome as time went on, that he finally joined the opponents of that town. The Bernese now stood almost alone, and their thirst for action was thoroughly aroused: they destroyed the castle of Giimminen, belonging to Fribourg (1332), took the field against Eberhard, attacked the lords ofWeissenburg, and overthrew them completely, destroyed Strattlingen and other castles, and finally, in 1334, won the valley of Hasle from the lords of Weissenburg.

These daring enterprises on the part of Berne exasperated the entire nobility to the utmost, and the latter soon found a favourable opportunity for making their hatred felt by that town.

The Emperor Louis being at this time under the papal ban, was not acknowledged by Berne, and therefore declared war against the latter.

The nobles of Burgundy now readily entered into an alliance with one another and with Louis against Berne, particularly the counts of Kiburg, Nidau, Aarberg, Strassburg, Neuchatel, Gruyere, &c, together with the dukes of Austria; the town of Fribourg also joined them, moved by jealousy against Berne. These opponents all assembled one day at Nidau, and renewed their ancient demands and claims; and upon Berne refusing to comply with all their desires, determined to destroy the town: all peaceable overtures were scornfully rejected, and when any of the nobles met a citizen of Berne they would mock him with the words: “If thou art from Berne, bow down and let us pass!”1 In the spring of 1339 they marched upon Laupen more than 15,000 men strong: the place was bravely defended by John von Bubenberg, the younger, till the Bernese hastened to the rescue, under the skilful leadership of Eudolf von Erlach. They brought with them auxiliaries from Soleure, the Forest States, and the valleys of Hasle and Simmen,

______________________________________________________________________________

The History of Nations, Volume 13
edited by Henry Cabot Lodge

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA374&lpg=PA374&dq=valley+of+von+hasle,&sig=euqT2pvH-zDEItQQl9M_7BNuJsA&ei=rhVGVMmwK5OjyAS1o4KABA&id=4aM-AAAAYAAJ&ots=8_iE0wKfm8&output=text

These daring enterprises on the part of Berne exasperated the entire nobility to the utmost, and the latter soon found a favorable opportunity for making their hatred felt by that town. The Emperor Louis, being at this time under the papal ban, was not acknowledged by Berne, and therefore declared war against the latter. The nobles of Burgundy now readily entered into an alliance with one another and with Louis against Berne, particularly the Counts of Kiburg, Nidau, Aarburg, Strassburg, Neuchatel, and Gruyere, together with the Dukes of Austria; the town of Fribourg also joined them, moved by jealousy against Berne. These opponents all assembled one day at Xidau and renewed their ancient demands and claims, and upon Berne refusing to comply with all their desires, determined to destroy the town; all peaceable overtures were scornfully rejected, and when.any of the nobles met a citizen of Berne they would mock him with the words: ** li thou art from Berne, bow down and let us pass!” 1In the spring of 1.339 they marched upon Laupen more than 15,000 men strong; the place was bravely defended by John von Bubenberg, the younger, till the Bernese hastened to the rescue under the skillful leadership of Rudolf von Erlach. They brought with them auxiliaries from Soleure, the Forest States, and the valleys of Hasle and Simmen, gathered under the banner of the White Cross—only 5000 men in all. But the enemy was forced to give way.to the violent and simultaneous attacks of the Bernese and the Forest States; the infantry first yielded, and after about an hour and a l“Bist von Bern, so duck’ dich and lass iibergahn!”

 

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