ORDINANCE OF 1787: THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT

http://law.onecle.com/uscode/12/24.html

Sec. 24. Corporate powers of associations

Upon duly making and filing articles of association and an organization certificate a national banking association shall become, as from the date of the execution of its organization certificate, a body corporate, and as such, and in the name designated in the organization certificate, it shall have power—
 First. To adopt and use a corporate seal.
 Second. To have succession from February 25, 1927, or from the date of its organization if organized after February 25, 1927, until such time as it be dissolved by the act of its shareholders owning two-thirds of its stock, or until its franchise becomes forfeited by reason of violation of law, or until terminated by either a general or a special Act of Congress or until its affairs be placed in the hands of a receiver and finally wound up by him.
 Third. To make contracts.
 Fourth. To sue and be sued, complain and defend, in any court of law and equity, as fully as natural persons.
 Fifth. To elect or appoint directors, and by its board of directors to appoint a president, vice president, cashier, and other officers, define their duties, require bonds of them and fix the penalty thereof, dismiss such officers or any of them at pleasure, and appoint others to fill their places.
 Sixth. To prescribe, by its board of directors, bylaws not inconsistent with law, regulating the manner in which its stock shall be transferred, its directors elected or appointed, its officers appointed, its property transferred, its general business conducted, and the privileges granted to it by law exercised and enjoyed.
 Seventh. To exercise by its board of directors or duly authorized officers or agents, subject to law, all such incidental powers as shall be necessary to carry on the business of banking; by discounting and negotiating promissory notes, drafts, bills of exchange, and other evidences of debt; by receiving deposits; by buying and selling exchange, coin, and bullion; by loaning money on personal security; and by obtaining, issuing, and circulating notes according to the provisions of title 62 of the Revised Statutes. The business of dealing in securities and stock by the association shall be limited to purchasing and selling such securities and stock without recourse, solely upon the order, and for the account of, customers, and in no case for its own account, and the association shall not underwrite any issue of securities or stock; Provided, That the association may purchase for its own account investment securities under such limitations and restrictions as the Comptroller of the Currency may by regulation prescribe. In no event shall the total amount of the investment securities of any one obligor or maker, held by the association for its own account, exceed at any time 10 per centum of its capital stock actually paid in and unimpaired and 10 per centum of its unimpaired surplus fund, except that this limitation shall not require any association to dispose of any securities lawfully held by it on August 23, 1935. As used in this section the term "investment securities" shall mean marketable obligations, evidencing indebtedness of any person, copartnership, association, or corporation in the form of bonds, notes and/or debentures commonly known as investment securities under such further definition of the term "investment securities" as may by regulation be prescribed by the Comptroller of the Currency. Except as hereinafter provided or otherwise permitted by law, nothing herein contained shall authorize the purchase by the association for its own account of any shares of stock of any corporation. The limitations and restrictions herein contained as to dealing in, underwriting and purchasing for its own account, investment securities shall not apply to obligations of the United States, or general obligations of any State or of any political subdivision thereof, or obligations of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority which are guaranteed by the Secretary of Transportation under section 9 of the National Capital Transportation Act of 1969, or obligations issued under authority of the Federal Farm Loan Act, as amended, or issued by the thirteen banks for cooperatives or any of them or the Federal Home Loan Banks, or obligations which are insured by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under title XI of the National Housing Act [12 U.S.C. 1749aaa et seq.] or obligations which are insured by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (hereinafter in this sentence referred to as the "Secretary") pursuant to section 207 of the National Housing Act [12 U.S.C. 1713], if the debentures to be issued in payment of such insured obligations are guaranteed as to principal and interest by the United States, or obligations, participations, or other instruments of or issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association, or the Government National Mortgage Association, or mortgages, obligations or other securities which are or ever have been sold by the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation pursuant to section 305 or section 306 of the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Act [12 U.S.C. 1454 or 1455], or obligations of the Federal Financing Bank or obligations of the Environmental Financing Authority, or obligations or other instruments or securities of the Student Loan Marketing Association, or such obligations of any local public agency (as defined in section 110(h) of the Housing Act of 1949 [42 U.S.C. 1460 (h)]) as are secured by an agreement between the local public agency and the Secretary in which the local public agency agrees to borrow from said Secretary, and said Secretary agrees to lend to said local public agency, monies in an aggregate amount which (together with any other monies irrevocably committed to the payment of interest on such obligations) will suffice to pay, when due, the interest on and all installments (including the final installment) of the principal of such obligations, which monies under the terms of said agreement are required to be used for such payments, or such obligations of a public housing agency (as defined in the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended [42 U.S.C. 1437 et seq.]) as are secured 
 (1) by an agreement between the public housing agency and the Secretary in which the public housing agency agrees to borrow from the Secretary, and the Secretary agrees to lend to the public housing agency, prior to the maturity of such obligations, monies in an amount which (together with any other monies irrevocably committed to the payment of interest on such obligations) will suffice to pay the principal of such obligations with interest to maturity thereon, which monies under the terms of said agreement are required to be used for the purpose of paying the principal of and the interest on such obligations at their maturity, 
 (2) by a pledge of annual contributions under an annual contributions contract between such public housing agency and the Secretary if such contract shall contain the covenant by the Secretary which is authorized by subsection (g) of section 6 of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended [42 U.S.C. 1437d (g)], and if the maximum sum and the maximum period specified in such contract pursuant to said subsection 6(g) [42 U.S.C. 1437d (g)] shall not be less than the annual amount and the period for payment which are requisite to provide for the payment when due of all installments of principal and interest on such obligations, or 
 (3) by a pledge of both annual contributions under an annual contributions contract containing the covenant by the Secretary which is authorized by section 6(g) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 [42 U.S.C. 1437d (g)], and a loan under an agreement between the local public housing agency and the Secretary in which the public housing agency agrees to borrow from the Secretary, and the Secretary agrees to lend to the public housing agency, prior to the maturity of the obligations involved, moneys in an amount which (together with any other moneys irrevocably committed under the annual contributions contract to the payment of principal and interest on such obligations) will suffice to provide for the payment when due of all installments of principal and interest on such obligations, which moneys under the terms of the agreement are required to be used for the purpose of paying the principal and interest on such obligations at their maturity: Provided, That in carrying on the business commonly known as the safe-deposit business the association shall not invest in the capital stock of a corporation organized under the law of any State to conduct a safe-deposit business in an amount in excess of 15 per centum of the capital stock of the association actually paid in and unimpaired and 15 per centum of its unimpaired surplus. The limitations and restrictions herein contained as to dealing in and underwriting investment securities shall not apply to obligations issued by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Inter-American Development Bank [1] Bank for Economic Cooperation and Development in the Middle East and North Africa,,[2] the North American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the African Development Bank, the Inter-American Investment Corporation, or the International Finance Corporation,,[2] or obligations issued by any State or political subdivision or any agency of a State or political subdivision for housing, university, or dormitory purposes, which are at the time eligible for purchase by a national bank for its own account, nor to bonds, notes and other obligations issued by the Tennessee Valley Authority or by the United States Postal Service: Provided, That no association shall hold obligations issued by any of said organizations as a result of underwriting, dealing, or purchasing for its own account (and for this purpose obligations as to which it is under commitment shall be deemed to be held by it) in a total amount exceeding at any one time 10 per centum of its capital stock actually paid in and unimpaired and 10 per centum of its unimpaired surplus fund. Notwithstanding any other provision in this paragraph, the association may purchase for its own account shares of stock issued by a corporation authorized to be created pursuant to title IX of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 [42 U.S.C. 3931 et seq.], and may make investments in a partnership, limited partnership, or joint venture formed pursuant to section 907(a) or 907(c) of that Act [42 U.S.C. 3937 (a) or 3937 (c)]. Notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph, the association may purchase for its own account shares of stock issued by any State housing corporation incorporated in the State in which the association is located and may make investments in loans and commitments for loans to any such corporation: Provided, That in no event shall the total amount of such stock held for its own account and such investments in loans and commitments made by the association exceed at any time 5 per centum of its capital stock actually paid in and unimpaired plus 5 per centum of its unimpaired surplus fund. Notwithstanding any other provision in this paragraph, the association may purchase for its own account shares of stock issued by a corporation organized solely for the purpose of making loans to farmers and ranchers for agricultural purposes, including the breeding, raising, fattening, or marketing of livestock. However, unless the association owns at least 80 per centum of the stock of such agricultural credit corporation the amount invested by the association at any one time in the stock of such corporation shall not exceed 20 per centum of the unimpaired capital and surplus of the association: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph, the association may purchase for its own account shares of stock of a bank insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or a holding company which owns or controls such an insured bank if the stock of such bank or company is owned exclusively (except to the extent directors’ qualifying shares are required by law) by depository institutions or depository institution holding companies (as defined in section 1813 of this title) and such bank or company and all subsidiaries thereof are engaged exclusively in providing services to or for other depository institutions, their holding companies, and the officers, directors, and employees of such institutions and companies, and in providing correspondent banking services at the request of other depository institutions or their holding companies (also referred to as a "banker’s bank"), but in no event shall the total amount of such stock held by the association in any bank or holding company exceed at any time 10 per centum of the association’s capital stock and paid in and unimpaired surplus and in no event shall the purchase of such stock result in an association’s acquiring more than 5 per centum of any class of voting securities of such bank or company. The limitations and restrictions contained in this paragraph as to an association purchasing for its own account investment securities shall not apply to securities that 
 (A) are offered and sold pursuant to section 4(5) of the Securities Act of 1933 (15 U.S.C. 77d (5)); 
 (B) are small business related securities (as defined in section 3(a)(53) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 [15 U.S.C. 78c (a)(53)]); or 
 (C) are mortgage related securities (as that term is defined in section 3(a)(41) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c (a)(41)).[3] The exception provided for the securities described in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) shall be subject to such regulations as the Comptroller of the Currency may prescribe, including regulations prescribing minimum size of the issue (at the time of initial distribution) or minimum aggregate sales prices, or both.
 
 A national banking association may deal in, underwrite, and purchase for such association’s own account qualified Canadian government obligations to the same extent that such association may deal in, underwrite, and purchase for such association’s own account obligations of the United States or general obligations of any State or of any political subdivision thereof. For purposes of this paragraph—
 (1) the term "qualified Canadian government obligations" means any debt obligation which is backed by Canada, any Province of Canada, or any political subdivision of any such Province to a degree which is comparable to the liability of the United States, any State, or any political subdivision thereof for any obligation which is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, such State, or such political subdivision, and such term includes any debt obligation of any agent of Canada or any such Province or any political subdivision of such Province if—
 (A) the obligation of the agent is assumed in such agent’s capacity as agent for Canada or such Province or such political subdivision; and
 (B) Canada, such Province, or such political subdivision on whose behalf such agent is acting with respect to such obligation is ultimately and unconditionally liable for such obligation; and
 (2) the term "Province of Canada" means a Province of Canada and includes the Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories and their successors.
 In addition to the provisions in this paragraph for dealing in, underwriting, or purchasing securities, the limitations and restrictions contained in this paragraph as to dealing in, underwriting, and purchasing investment securities for the national bank’s own account shall not apply to obligations (including limited obligation bonds, revenue bonds, and obligations that satisfy the requirements of section 142 (b)(1) of title 26) issued by or on behalf of any State or political subdivision of a State, including any municipal corporate instrumentality of 1 or more States, or any public agency or authority of any State or political subdivision of a State, if the national bank is well capitalized (as defined in section 1831o of this title).
 Eighth. To contribute to community funds, or to charitable, philanthropic, or benevolent instrumentalities conducive to public welfare, such sums as its board of directors may deem expedient and in the interests of the association, if it is located in a State the laws of which do not expressly prohibit State banking institutions from contributing to such funds or instrumentalities.
 Ninth. To issue and sell securities which are guaranteed pursuant to section 1721 (g) of this title.
 Tenth. To invest in tangible personal property, including, without limitation, vehicles, manufactured homes, machinery, equipment, or furniture, for lease financing transactions on a net lease basis, but such investment may not exceed 10 percent of the assets of the association.
 Eleventh. To make investments directly or indirectly, each of which is designed primarily to promote the public welfare, including the welfare of low- and moderate-income communities or families (such as by providing housing, services, or jobs). An association shall not make any such investment if the investment would expose the association to unlimited liability. The Comptroller of the Currency shall limit an association’s investments in any 1 project and an association’s aggregate investments under this paragraph. An association’s aggregate investments under this paragraph shall not exceed an amount equal to the sum of 5 percent of the association’s capital stock actually paid in and unimpaired and 5 percent of the association’s unimpaired surplus fund, unless the Comptroller determines by order that the higher amount will pose no significant risk to the affected deposit insurance fund, and the association is adequately capitalized. In no case shall an association’s aggregate investments under this paragraph exceed an amount equal to the sum of 15 percent of the association’s capital stock actually paid in and unimpaired and 15 percent of the association’s unimpaired surplus fund. The foregoing standards and limitations apply to investments under this paragraph made by a national bank directly and by its subsidiaries.
 [1] So in original. Probably should be followed by a comma.
 [2] So in original.
 [3] So in original. The period probably should be preceded by an additional closing parenthesis.

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Last modified: July 21, 2011

 

 

[THE TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT WAS TAKEN FROM THE 1994 U.S. CODE ON CD-ROM.]

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USC – ORDINANCE OF 1787: THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT

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ORDINANCE OF 1787: THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT

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ORDINANCE OF 1787: THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT

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(THE CONFEDERATE CONGRESS, JULY 13, 1787)
An Ordinance for the government of the territory of the United
States northwest of the river Ohio
Section 1. Be it ordained by the United States in Congress
assembled, That the said territory, for the purpose of temporary
government, be one district, subject, however, to be divided into
two districts, as future circumstances may, in the opinion of
Congress, make it expedient.
Sec. 2. Be it ordained by the authority aforesaid, That the
estates both of resident and non-resident proprietors in the said
territory, dying intestate, shall descent to, and be distributed
among, their children and the descendants of a deceased child in
equal parts, the descendants of a deceased child or grandchild to
take the share of their deceased parent in equal parts among them;
and where there shall be no children or descendants, then in equal
parts to the next of kin, in equal degree; and among collaterals,
the children of a deceased brother or sister of the intestate shall
have, in equal parts among them, their deceased parent’s share; and
there shall, in no case, be a distinction between kindred of the
whole and half blood; saving in all cases to the widow of the
intestate, her third part of the real estate for life, and
one-third part of the personal estate; and this law relative to
descents and dower, shall remain in full force until altered by the
legislature of the district.  And until the governor and judges
shall adopt laws as hereinafter mentioned, estates in the said
territory may be devised or bequeathed by wills in writing, signed
and sealed by him or her in whom the estate may be, (being of full
age,) and attested by three witnesses; and real estates may be
conveyed by lease and release, or bargain and sale, signed, sealed,
and delivered by the person, being of full age, in whom the estate
may be, and attested by two witnesses, provided such wills be duly
proved, and such conveyances be acknowledged, or the execution
thereof duly proved, and be recorded within one year after proper
magistrates, courts, and registers, shall be appointed for that
purpose; and personal property may be transferred by delivery,
saving, however, to the French and Canadian inhabitants, and other
settlers of the Kaskaskies, Saint Vincents, and the neighboring
villages, who have heretofore professed themselves citizens of
Virginia, their laws and customs now in force among them, relative
to the descent and conveyance of property.
Sec. 3. Be it ordained by the authority aforesaid, That there
shall be appointed, from time to time, by Congress, a governor,
whose commission shall continue in force for the term of three
years, unless sooner revoked by Congress; he shall reside in the
district, and have a freehold estate therein, in one thousand acres
of land, while in the exercise of his office.
Sec. 4. There shall be appointed from time to time, by Congress,
a secretary, whose commission shall continue in force for four
years, unless sooner revoked; he shall reside in the district, and
have a freehold estate therein, in five hundred acres of land,
while in the exercise of his office.  It shall be his duty to keep
and preserve the acts and laws passed by the legislature, and the
public records of the district, and the proceedings of the governor
in his executive department, and transmit authentic copies of such
acts and proceedings every six months to the Secretary of Congress.
There shall also be appointed a court, to consist of three judges,
any two of whom to form a court, who shall have a common-law
jurisdiction, and reside in the district, and have each therein a
freehold estate, in five hundred acres of land, while in the
exercise of their offices; and their commissions shall continue in
force during good behavior.
Sec. 5. The governor and judges, or a majority of them, shall
adopt and publish in the district such laws of the original States,
criminal and civil, as may be necessary, and best suited to the
circumstances of the district, and report them to Congress from
time to time, which laws shall be in force in the district until
the organization of the general assembly therein, unless
disapproved of by Congress; but afterwards the legislature shall
have authority to alter them as they shall think fit.
Sec. 6. The governor, for the time being, shall be
commander-in-chief of the militia, appoint and commission all
officers in the same below the rank of general officers; all
general officers shall be appointed and commissioned by Congress.
Sec. 7. Previous to the organization of the general assembly the
governor shall appoint such magistrates, and other civil officers,
in each county or township, as he shall find necessary for the
preservation of the peace and good order in the same.  After the
general assembly shall be organized the powers and duties of
magistrates and other civil officers shall be regulated and defined
by the said assembly; but all magistrates and other civil officers,
not herein otherwise directed, shall, during the continuance of
this temporary government, be appointed by the governor.
Sec. 8. For the prevention of crimes and injuries, the laws to be
adopted or made shall have force in all parts of the district, and
for the execution of process, criminal and civil, the governor
shall make proper divisions thereof; and he shall proceed, from
time to time, as circumstances may require, to lay out the parts of
the district in which the Indian titles shall have been
extinguished, into counties and townships, subject, however, to
such alterations as may thereafter be made by the legislature.
Sec. 9. So soon as there shall be five thousand free male
inhabitants, of full age, in the district, upon giving proof
thereof to the governor, they shall receive authority, with time
and place, to elect representatives from their counties or
townships, to represent them in the general assembly: Provided,
That for every five hundred free male inhabitants there shall be
one representative, and so on, progressively, with the number of
free male inhabitants, shall the right of representation increase,
until the number of representatives shall amount to twenty-five;
after which the number and proportion of representatives shall be
regulated by the legislature: Provided, That no person be eligible
or qualified to act as a representative, unless he shall have been
a citizen of one of the United States three years, and be a
resident in the district, or unless he shall have resided in the
district three years; and, in either case, shall likewise hold in
his own right, in fee-simple, two hundred acres of land within the
same: Provided also, That a freehold in fifty acres of land in the
district, having been a citizen of one of the States, and being
resident in the district, or the like freehold and two years’
residence in the district, shall be necessary to qualify a man as
an elector of a representative.
Sec. 10. The representatives thus elected shall serve for the
term of two years; and in case of the death of a representative, or
removal from office, the governor shall issue a writ to the county
or township, for which he was a member, to elect another in his
stead, to serve for the residue of the term.
Sec. 11. The general assembly or legislature, shall consist of
the governor, legislative counsel, and a house of representatives.
The legislative council shall consist of five members, to continue
in office five years, unless sooner removed by Congress; any three
of whom to be a quorum; and the members of the council shall be
nominated and appointed in the following manner, to wit: As soon as
representatives shall be elected the governor shall appoint a time
and place for them to meet together, and when met they shall
nominate ten persons, resident in the district, and each possessed
of a freehold in five hundred acres of land, and return their names
to Congress, five of whom Congress shall appoint and commission to
serve as aforesaid; and whenever a vacancy shall happen in the
council, by death or removal from office, the house of
representatives shall nominate two persons, qualified as aforesaid,
for each vacancy, and return their names to Congress, one of whom
Congress shall appoint and commission for the residue of the term;
and every five years, four months at least before the expiration of
the time of service of the members of the council, the said house
shall nominate ten persons, qualified as aforesaid, and return
their names to Congress, five of whom Congress shall appoint and
commission to serve as members of the council five years, unless
sooner removed.  And the governor, legislative council, and house
of representatives shall have authority to make laws in all cases
for the good government of the district, not repugnant to the
principles and articles in this ordinance established and
declared.  And all bills, having passed by a majority in the house,
and by a majority in the council, shall be referred to the governor
for his assent; but no bill, or legislative act whatever, shall be
of any force without his assent.  The governor shall have power to
convene, prorogue, and dissolve the general assembly when, in his
opinion, it shall be expedient.
Sec. 12. The governor, judges, legislative council, secretary,
and such other officers as Congress shall appoint in the district,
shall take an oath or affirmation of fidelity, and of office; the
governor before the President of Congress, and all other officers
before the governor.  As soon as a legislature shall be formed in
the district, the council and house assembled, in one room, shall
have authority, by joint ballot, to elect a delegate to Congress,
who shall have a seat in Congress with a right of debating, but not
of voting, during this temporary government.
Sec. 13. And for extending the fundamental principles of civil
and religious liberty, which form the basis whereon these
republics, their laws and constitutions, are erected; to fix and
establish those principles as the basis of all laws, constitutions,
and governments, which forever hereafter shall be formed in the
said territory; to provide, also, for the establishment of States,
and permanent government therein, and for their admission to a
share in the Federal councils on an equal footing with the original
States, at as early periods as may be consistent with the general
interest:
Sec. 14. It is hereby ordained and declared, by the authority
aforesaid, that the following articles shall be considered as
articles of compact, between the original States and the people and
States in the said territory, and forever remain unalterable,
unless by common consent, to wit:
ARTICLE I
No person, demeaning himself in a peaceable and orderly manner,
shall ever be molested on account of his mode of worship, or
religious sentiments, in the said territories.
ARTICLE II
The inhabitants of the said territory shall always be entitled to
the benefits of the writs of habeas corpus, and of the trial by
jury; of a proportionate representation of the people in the
legislature, and of judicial proceedings according to the course of
the common law.  All persons shall be bailable, unless for capital
offences, where the proof shall be evident, or the presumption
great.  All fines shall be moderate; and no cruel or unusual
punishments shall be inflicted.  No man shall be deprived of his
liberty or property, but by the judgment of his peers, or the law
of the land, and should the public exigencies make it necessary,
for the common preservation, to take any person’s property, or to
demand his particular services, full compensation shall be paid for
the same.  And, in the just preservation of rights and property, it
is understood and declared, that no law ought ever to be made or
have force in the said territory, that shall, in any manner
whatever, interfere with or affect private contracts, or
engagements, bona fide, and without fraud previously formed.
ARTICLE III
Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good
government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of
education shall forever be encouraged.  The utmost good faith shall
always be observed towards the Indians; their lands and property
shall never be taken from them without their consent; and in their
property, rights, and liberty they never shall be invaded or
disturbed, unless in just and lawful wars authorized by Congress;
but laws founded in justice and humanity shall, from time to time,
be made, for preventing wrongs being done to them, and for
preserving peace and friendship with them.
ARTICLE IV
The said territory, and the States which may be formed therein,
shall forever remain a part of this confederacy of the United
States of America, subject to the Articles of Confederation, and to
such alterations therein as shall be constitutionally made; and to
all the acts and ordinances of the United States in Congress
assembled, conformable thereto.  The inhabitants and settlers in
the said territory shall be subject to pay a part of the Federal
debts, contracted, or to be contracted, and a proportional part of
the expenses of government to be apportioned on them by Congress,
according to the same common rule and measure by which
apportionments thereof shall be made on the other States; and the
taxes for paying their proportion shall be laid and levied by the
authority and direction of the legislatures of the district, or
districts, or new States, as in the original States, within the
time agreed upon by the United States in Congress assembled.  The
legislatures of those districts, or new States, shall never
interfere with the primary disposal of the soil by the United
States in Congress assembled, nor with any regulations Congress may
find necessary for securing the title in such soil to the bona fide
purchasers.  No tax shall be imposed on lands the property of the
United States; and in no case shall non-resident proprietors be
taxed higher than residents.  The navigable waters leading into the
Mississippi and Saint Lawrence, and the carrying places between the
same, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the
inhabitants of the said territory as to the citizens of the United
States, and those of any other States that may be admitted into the
confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
ARTICLE V
There shall be formed in the said territory not less than three
nor more than five States; and the boundaries of the States, as
soon as Virginia shall alter her act of cession and consent to the
same, shall become fixed and established as follows, to wit: The
western State, in the said territory, shall be bounded by the
Mississippi, the Ohio, and the Wabash Rivers; a direct line drawn
from the Wabash and Post Vincents, due north, to the territorial
line between the United States and Canada; and by the said
territorial line to the Lake of the Woods and Mississippi. The
middle State shall be bounded by the said direct line, the Wabash
from Post Vincents to the Ohio, by the Ohio, by a direct line drawn
due north from the mouth of the Great Miami to the said territorial
line, and by the said territorial line.  The eastern State shall be
bounded by the last-mentioned direct line, the Ohio, Pennsylvania,
and the said territorial line: Provided, however, And it is further
understood and declared, that the boundaries of these three States
shall be subject so far to be altered, that, if Congress shall
hereafter find it expedient, they shall have authority to form one
or two States in that part of the said territory which lies north
of an east and west line drawn through the southerly bend or
extreme of Lake Michigan. And whenever any of the said States shall
have sixty thousand free inhabitants therein, such State shall be
admitted, by its delegates, into the Congress of the United States,
on an equal footing with the original States, in all respects
whatever; and shall be at liberty to form a permanent constitution
and State government: Provided, The constitution and government, so
to be formed, shall be republican, and in conformity to the
principles contained in these articles, and, so far as it can be
consistent with the general interest of the confederacy, such
admission shall be allowed at an earlier period, and when there may
be a less number of free inhabitants in the State than sixty
thousand.
ARTICLE VI
There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the
said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof
the party shall have been duly convicted: Provided always, That any
person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is
lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive
may be lawfully reclaimed, and conveyed to the person claiming his
or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Be it ordained by the authority aforesaid, That the resolutions
of the 23d of April, 1784, relative to the subject of this
ordinance, be, and the same are hereby, repealed, and declared null
and void.
Done by the United States, in Congress assembled, the 13th day of
July, in the year of our Lord 1787, and of their sovereignty and
independence the twelfth.
-END-http://www.nontaxpayer.net/nw_ord.html

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